Term life insurance pays a specific lump sum to your loved ones for a specified period of time – usually from one to 20 years. If you stop paying premiums, the insurance stops. Term policies pay benefits if you die during the period covered by the policy, but they do not build cash value. They may also give you the option to port. That is, you can take the coverage with you if you leave your company.
Of all the variables that affect your premium, the most important will be replacement cost value. This is the amount of money needed to completely rebuild or replace your home in the aftermath of catastrophe. That number isn’t going to be the same as what you paid for your home (it should account for appreciation), nor the market value (which accounts for the plot of land and location). It’s best to hire an independent appraiser to get this number right and then confirm it with an appraiser from your insurance company. Now, the higher the replacement cost, the higher your premium, but don’t be tempted to underestimate it even if you’re eager to trim policy costs. This value is critical — protection against loss is the whole point of carrying insurance.
Analysis: When a broker says that, it means another broker has made a submission to the insurer in your name. That’s most likely the incumbent broker. In fact, the incumbent may have submitted your name to 10 insurers — often, without your approval or even your knowledge. This is a disguise. The incumbent appears to be shopping for a better deal on your behalf, while the actual motive is to freeze out competitors.
Insurance brokers represent the insurance buyer – you the consumer or business owner.  They are appointed or contracted with multiple insurance companies.  They have the flexibility to discuss many options and companies that meet your needs and budget. Insurance brokers have been around as long as insurance agents.  In many cases people will refer to insurance brokers as independent insurance agents.

In the United States, insurance brokers are regulated by the individual U.S. states. Most states require anyone who sells, solicits, or negotiates insurance in that state to obtain an insurance broker license, with certain limited exceptions. This includes a business entity, the business entity's officers or directors (the "sublicensees" through whom the business entity operates), and individual employees. In order to obtain a broker's license, a person typically must take pre-licensing courses and pass an examination. An insurance broker also must submit an application (with an application fee) to the state insurance regulator in the state in which the applicant wishes to do business, who will determine whether the insurance broker has met all the state requirements and will typically do a background check to determine whether the applicant is considered trustworthy and competent. A criminal conviction, for example, may result in a state determining that the applicant is untrustworthy or incompetent. Some states also require applicants to submit fingerprints.
By raising the amount you’ll pay out of pocket before your insurance kicks in, you’ll lower your premiums (monthly/yearly payments). You can save as much as 25% by raising your deductible to $1,000. This can be a risky choice, though, and should be considered carefully — it’s important that you don’t raise your deductible so high that you can’t afford to pay it when something goes wrong. If you live in a disaster-prone area or have trouble saving, keeping a low deductible and investing in protection on a monthly basis is the safer choice.
We looked to J.D. Power’s annual U.S. Household Insurance Study, which includes scores based on how well “customers rate the claims experience with their current homeowners insurance provider,” and required three or more Power Circles. Consumer Reports also published data from nearly 10,000 survey respondents who filed claims from January 2010 to June of 2016, in which they rated carriers on criteria including agent courtesy and problem-free claims experiences. We looked for a grade of 80 or above.

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With 10 discounts offered in total, Amica is second only to Allstate. Notably unique are its paperless bill and loyalty discounts, which can save you both work and money (you won’t have to mail in your check or shop around for new providers). You can also take advantage of a full gamut of standard discounts for security and safety — things like owning or installing fire extinguishers, sprinklers, and fire alarms.
In short, yes. Think carefully before filing a claim on your homeowners insurance, as it will directly affect the amount you’ll pay going forward. If you have two claims within three years, or three claims within five years, that increase can be as high as 20% as you’re shifted into a “high risk” category. It could be another five years before those claims drop off your record and the premium prices decrease.

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