While an insurance carrier and an insurance broker are two separate entities with two separate roles, the two go hand-in-hand helping nonprofits establish and maintain insurance coverage. For nonprofits seeking an insurance policy, it’s essential to work with a broker and a carrier that know and understand the unique needs of the sector. With this, nonprofits can continue with their missions, without having to stress out about potential or unknown risks derailing operations.
How you buy your Progressive Home Advantage policy — directly through us (online, by mobile device or by phone) or through an independent agent/broker rather than PAA — determines which insurers are available to you. Use the link above to get a rate from one of the insurers. Or contact us to see if we can get you a rate from any of the other insurers. Policies sold through agents and brokers are available from them and through Progressive.com/agent.
Because we require that our nonprofit members work with a broker, and because nonprofit insurance is such a specific niche of the marketplace, we provide broker referrals to nonprofits for brokers that specialize in working with nonprofits. While brokers who don’t specialize in nonprofits can still provide great service, they need to understand the special risks faced by nonprofits and the insurance coverage nuances available from specialty insurance carriers.  If a broker doesn’t typically work with nonprofits, they may not be familiar with the variety of options available.
Of all our top picks, The Hartford has the fewest number of discounts: three of them, to be precise, for bundling policies, home security devices, and retirees. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll pay more for your home insurance. Just because a company offers 12 discounts doesn’t mean you’ll qualify for all (or any) of them, so it’s always worth comparing quotes instead of solely counting discounts.

Insurance brokerage is largely associated with general insurance (car, house etc.) rather than life insurance, although some brokers continued to provide investment and life insurance brokerage until the onset of new regulation in 2001. This drove a more transparent regime, based predominantly on upfront negotiation of a fee for the provision of advice and/or services. This saw the splitting of intermediaries into two groups: general insurance intermediaries/brokers and independent financial advisers (IFAs) for life insurance, investments and pensions.

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