The National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC) is the U.S. standard-setting and regulatory support organization created and governed by the chief insurance regulators from the 50 states, the District of Columbia and five U.S. territories. Through the NAIC, state insurance regulators establish standards and best practices, conduct peer review, and coordinate their regulatory oversight. NAIC staff supports these efforts and represents the collective views of state regulators domestically and internationally. NAIC members, together with the central resources of the NAIC, form the national system of state-based insurance regulation in the U.S. For more information, visit www.naic.org.
Amica consistently ranks among the top homeowners carriers by J.D. Power and Consumer Reports, due to its sky-high customer satisfaction with the all-important claims process (settlement, estimation, and repair). This is arguably the most essential element of good customer service in the industry. Amica was the only one of our top providers that received a five out of five in every category from J.D. Power. Amica also received a Consumer Reports reader score of 94 — two points better than USAA, the gold standard in insurance. None of our other finalists came anywhere close. With excellent scores across the board, you can expect timely and helpful interactions with Amica representatives.
Only eight companies out of the 14 below made our top picks list. Those listed as “best for…” each stood out to us in a certain area, whether it was a unique coverage option, stellar customer service, or an easy shopping process. That said, the other half may have options that interest you. (For instance: If you have an auto insurance policy with one of these companies, you might want to consider bundling discounts.)
In short, yes. Think carefully before filing a claim on your homeowners insurance, as it will directly affect the amount you’ll pay going forward. If you have two claims within three years, or three claims within five years, that increase can be as high as 20% as you’re shifted into a “high risk” category. It could be another five years before those claims drop off your record and the premium prices decrease.

Auto Insurance

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